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Watch for Coronavirus Scams

Scammers prey on fear. Know how they operate so you don't fall for it.

Scammers are notorious for capitalizing on fear, and the coronavirus outbreak is no exception. Showing an appalling lack of the most basic morals, scammers have set up fake websites, bogus funding collections and more in an effort to trick the fearful and unsuspecting out of their money.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has published on its website a warning against email scams connected to the coronavirus. The agency claims it has received reports from around the world about phishing attempts mentioning coronavirus on an almost daily basis.

Closer to home, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is warning against a surge in coronavirus scams, which are being executed with surprising sophistication, so they may be difficult for even the keenest of eyes to spot.

The best weapons against these scams are awareness and education. When people know about circulating scams and how to identify them, they’re already several steps ahead of the scammers. Here’s all you need to know about coronavirus-related scams.

How the scams play out

There are several scams exploiting the fear and uncertainty surrounding the virus. Here are some of the most prevalent:

The fake funding scam

In this scam, victims receive bogus emails, text messages or social media posts asking them to donate money to a research team that is supposedly on the verge of developing a drug to treat COVID-19. Others claim they are nearing a vaccine for immunizing the population against the virus. There have also been ads circulating on the internet with similar requests. Unfortunately, nearly all of these are fakes, and any money donated to these “funds” will help line the scammers’ pockets.

The bogus health agency

There is so much conflicting information on the coronavirus that it’s really a no-brainer that scammers are exploiting the confusion. Scammers are sending out alerts appearing to be from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or the WHO; however, they’re actually created by the scammers. These emails sport the logo of the agencies that allegedly sent them, and the URL is similar to those of the agencies as well. Some scammers will even invent their own “health agency,” such as “The Health Department,” taking care to evoke authenticity with bogus contact information and logos.

Victims who don’t know better will believe these missives are sent by legitimate agencies. While some of these emails and posts may actually provide useful information, they often also spread misinformation to promote fear-mongering, such as nonexistent local diagnoses of the virus. Even worse, they infect the victims’ computers with malware which is then used to scrape personal information off the infected devices.

The phony purchase order

Scammers are hacking the computer systems at medical treatment centers and obtaining information about outstanding orders for face masks and other supplies. The scammers then send the buyer a phony purchase order listing the requested supplies and asking for payment. The employee at the treatment center wires payment directly into the scammer’s account. Unfortunately, they’ll have to pay the bill again when contacted by the legitimate supplier.

Preventing scams

Basic preventative measures can keep scammers from making you their next target.

As always, it’s important to keep the anti-malware and antivirus software on your computer up to date, and to strengthen the security settings on all of your devices.

Practice responsible browsing when online. Never download an attachment from an unknown source or click on links embedded in an email or social media post from an unknown individual. Don’t share sensitive information online, either. If you’re unsure about a website’s authenticity, check the URL and look for the lock icon and the “s” after the “http” indicating the site is secure.

Finally, it’s a good idea to stay updated on the latest news about the coronavirus to avoid falling prey to misinformation. Check the actual CDC and WHO websites for the latest updates. You can donate funds toward research on these sites as well.

Spotting the scams

Scammers give themselves away when they ask for payment via specific means, including a wire transfer or prepaid gift card. Scams are also easily spotted by claims of urgency, such as “Act now!” Another giveaway is poor writing skills, including grammatical errors, awkward syntax and misspelled words. In the coronavirus scams, “Breaking information” alerts appearing to be from health agencies are another sign of a scam.

You can keep yourself safe from the coronavirus by practicing good hygiene habits and avoid coronavirus scams by practicing healthy internet usage. Keep yourself in the know about the latest developments.

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  • What can I expect in regard to credit limit?

    The credit limit on your Listerhill business credit card will be dictated by numerous factors, including your current debt-to-income ratio. Although there is no single answer to this question, it is worth noting that small business owners in 2016 had a median total credit limit of $56,100 across all of their credit cards. If you are concerned about the credit limit you are granted, our account representatives are here to provide you with assistance. 

    Your credit limit may also be affected by your personal credit score. If your FICO score is below a certain threshold, you could find yourself with a lower credit limit than you would like. The good news is that there are many steps you can take to improve your FICO rating, ultimately increasing your credit limit over time.

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    It is important to note that if your Listerhill business credit card activity does appear on your personal credit report, there will be no differentiation between the two. In other words, business expenditures will be treated the same as personal purchases by the credit bureaus. Thus, it is crucially important to keep your new business Visa in good standing.

  • Why should I choose the Listerhill Business Credit Card?

    We know you have a lot of choices when it comes to applying for a business credit card. At Listerhill Credit Union, we take pride in providing our clients with more benefits than they can count! First and foremost, you will have access to the best customer service in the industry. You are more than a number to us and we will always be here to provide you with the assistance you need.

    We also provide our clients with peace of mind if their Visa cards become lost or stolen. Whether you drop your card while running errands locally or it gets stolen on an overseas business trip, our team is here to make sure you are taken care of. 

    Finally, the advantages of the Listerhill Business Visa itself are worth the application. Our rates and fees will always remain competitive, so you can trust you’re never paying too much for your business expenses. You will also earn the aforementioned rewards on eligible purchases every time you use your card.

  • When can I apply?
    • Starting April 3, 2020, small businesses and sole proprietorships can apply for and receive loans to cover their payroll and other certain expenses through existing SBA lenders. 
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